Awe and anxiety: what artificial intelligence means for IP

06-05-2016

Awe and anxiety: what artificial intelligence means for IP

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With some predicting that artificial intelligence (AI) will allow a patent to be filed and granted without human intervention within the next 25 years, WIPR assesses the potential impact of AI on the IP landscape.

Since the term artificial intelligence (AI) was coined by computer scientist John McCarthy in the 1950s, studies on the subject have been mostly left to those working in academia or film makers and novelists dreaming up a global apocalypse unwittingly engineered by humans.

The rapid development of AI technology in the last decade has changed that, however. AI technology is present in millions of smartphone devices in circulation across the globe. More people have been pushed into the AI conversation as its disruptive potential threatens to affect and even replace jobs in the services and creative sectors. Even the legal industry is vulnerable to the latest advancements in AI technology.

In 2015, the Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) held a debate at the Science Museum in London on the question of whether a patent will be filed and granted without human intervention within the next 25 years. A 140-strong audience heard from people working in private practice, authors on the subject and a representative from the UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO). After a lengthy and stimulating debate on the question, the audience voted 80 to 60 that a patent would be granted without human input.


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WIPR